Tag Archives: sound

The Cocktail Party Problem

You’re at a crowded cocktail party (or a bar or anywhere else crowded, for that matter) and you somehow hear someone talking to you. How does that happen? Your ears are taking in so much sound and somehow you are able to make sense out of that one voice. This is a central question within the neuroscience of sound perception.  In this episode, we trace an outline for how we hear in this crowded cocktail party. Listen to University of Maryland Professor, Shihab Shamma, explain.

This is the eleventh (and final) piece in a series about the information found in sound. Contributors to this piece can be found here.

Plasticity

You might have heard about people surviving horrific brain trauma and regaining a normal life. Why is the brain able to change itself in order to process different information? Hear about an interesting experiment that uses baby ferrets and more.

This is the sixth piece in a series about the information found in sound. Contributors to this piece can be found here.

For more on plasticity, check out this really good TED talk from Michael Merzenich:

Sound is…


A fetus begins to respond to sound at 18 weeks old. We are bathed in sound every day of our lives and yet it isn’t clear what exactly the phenomenon is because it isn’t as visible as, say, light. In this small episode we dissect the outward physical description of sound and also touch on the main aspects of the subjective perception of sound. Learn why instruments and voices are recognizable and why we can learn to echolocate.


This is the first piece in a series about the information found in sound. Contributors to this piece can be found here.